Students gear up to take SAT

Young scholars develop study strategies for college entry tests.

Test+dates+are+offered+throughout+the+school+year+as+well+as+over+the+summer.+Many+students+have+scheduled+their+SAT+or+ACT+dates+with+their+respective+school+counselors.+
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Students gear up to take SAT

Test dates are offered throughout the school year as well as over the summer. Many students have scheduled their SAT or ACT dates with their respective school counselors.

Test dates are offered throughout the school year as well as over the summer. Many students have scheduled their SAT or ACT dates with their respective school counselors.

Emma Barfield

Test dates are offered throughout the school year as well as over the summer. Many students have scheduled their SAT or ACT dates with their respective school counselors.

Emma Barfield

Emma Barfield

Test dates are offered throughout the school year as well as over the summer. Many students have scheduled their SAT or ACT dates with their respective school counselors.

Katie Morris, Staff writer

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As the school year comes to an end, many students are thinking about taking the SAT and ACT. However, students should consider preparing for the tests during the summer. According to some students, there are several ways to prep for testing, but planning is the key to success.  

To begin with, students should register. Each month there is one testing site within every school district. One should check the College Board website for dates and times. There is a cutoff date for registration so students should not wait until the last minute. Next, set up a plan. Students like Emma Stacey, senior, advises one to get comfortable with the standardized tests.

“I started in 8th grade taking the PSAT to get familiar with the the format of the SAT,” Stacey said.

This practice test also determines strengths and weaknesses. Erica Degue, senior, focused on what she struggled with after seeing her score.

“I took a math class twice weekly online to help improve my SAT score,” Degue said.

Set up a study schedule spending a consistent amount of time each week leading up to the test date. This will help develop a study habit and allow progress at a steady pace. Many experts also suggest setting a score goal depending on one’s prospective colleges.

“I got the overall books and the Princeton guide and the huge thick books because it has all the subjects,” Jacob Holub, sophomore,said.

Self-preparation is the cheapest method of studying, but it is often the hardest and most difficult to determine progress. Online programs can help determine what someone needs extra help with while monitoring progress.

“If you have a lot of improvement to make, It may be hard for you to self-diagnose your own weaknesses,” Ellen McCammon from prepscholar.com said.

There are many free online practice tests available one can use to prepare for the test. Students who are not satisfied with their score have opportunities to retake.

“I’ve taken the SAT twice and all that practicing has helped me,” Stacey said.

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