Ending End of Course: What New Amendment Means for AP Students

An amendment to the Testing Board Policy exempts AP students from EOC testing.

With+the+new+amendment+to+the+testing+board+policy%2C+AP+students+are+exempt+from+EOC+testing.+%E2%80%9CI%E2%80%99ve+always+thought+that+it+was+unfair+to+require+both+tests+because+AP+students+generally+have+no+problem+at+all+with+the+EOC+and+it+is+just+an+added+task+that+they+have+to+complete%2C%E2%80%9D+Jeff+Burns%2C+AP+US+History+teacher%2C+said.
Back to Article
Back to Article

Ending End of Course: What New Amendment Means for AP Students

With the new amendment to the testing board policy, AP students are exempt from EOC testing. “I’ve always thought that it was unfair to require both tests because AP students generally have no problem at all with the EOC and it is just an added task that they have to complete,” Jeff Burns, AP US History teacher, said.

With the new amendment to the testing board policy, AP students are exempt from EOC testing. “I’ve always thought that it was unfair to require both tests because AP students generally have no problem at all with the EOC and it is just an added task that they have to complete,” Jeff Burns, AP US History teacher, said.

Ashley Edwards

With the new amendment to the testing board policy, AP students are exempt from EOC testing. “I’ve always thought that it was unfair to require both tests because AP students generally have no problem at all with the EOC and it is just an added task that they have to complete,” Jeff Burns, AP US History teacher, said.

Ashley Edwards

Ashley Edwards

With the new amendment to the testing board policy, AP students are exempt from EOC testing. “I’ve always thought that it was unfair to require both tests because AP students generally have no problem at all with the EOC and it is just an added task that they have to complete,” Jeff Burns, AP US History teacher, said.

Maria Adams and Ashley Edwards

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Earlier this month, the Georgia Department of Education (GADOE) amended the new End of Course (EOC) testing policy. The amendment exempts Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate (AP and IB) students from double testing the AP/IB exam and EOC. Brian Kemp, governor, and Richard Woods, state superintendent, actively supported and advocated for the amendment due to the unpopularity among teachers, parents and students of double testing. They wrote letters to the Department of Education about the difficulties of being tested on two different standards.

“When we hear from parents, teachers, students that there is an issue, sometimes it might take us some time to address it, but we do hear those voices and want to address their concerns,” Meghan Frick, GADOE Director of Communications, said.

This was not the first amendment to the policy. In 2016, the State Board of Education eliminated End of Course testing for most dual enrollment courses if they pass the course and receive college credit. Governor Kemp and Superintendent Woods have traveled to all 16 Regional Education Service Agency(RESA). They have spoken to educational leaders regarding different opportunities and programs offered in Georgia.

We feel [double testing] places an undue burden on the classroom and takes up instructional time and time that is for teachers to teach and for you as students to learn”

— Meghan Frick

“AP courses and DE [Dual Enrollment] courses both present incredible opportunities for students and it depends on the student’s long term plans in terms of college choice and career choice, so it is difficult to say if one is better than the other. But it is very important that students have as much information as possible to make the best decision for him [or] her,” Rod May, assistant principal at Ola High School, said.

The GADOE previously exempted dual enrollment students because colleges have different standards. The AP/IB exam is equivalent to college credit, but colleges accept different exam scores for credit. The GADOE changed the policy to remove stress from students who are learning AP/IB standards and state standards, which are similar but have distinct differences. 

“We feel [double testing] places an undue burden on the classroom and takes up instructional time and time that is for teachers to teach and for you as students to learn,” Frick said.

The federal law requires a state to test their students in math, English and science, yet Georgia is above the minimum which Superintendent Woods wants to change. Throughout the past years, society has seen an increase in required standardized testing, and students currently have to take eight EOCs. 

“We exempted as many courses as possible but there are still courses that are required by federal law, so students will still have to take the EOC in 9th grade,” Frick said. 

Due to double testing impeding on class time, teachers supported this change. 

“For us in our experience at Ola, we never had a student who took AP Macro[economics], not pass the [EOC] exams. Usually, their scores are A’s or B’s on the[EOC]. We juggle teaching the milestone standards and Macro[economics] standards which are not identical, so we are always taking away from AP teaching to throw in the milestones,” Chris Gardner, AP Macroeconomics teacher, said.

Jeff Burns, AP US History teacher, believes the stress put upon AP students is overwhelming enough and extra testing is ineffective.

“I’ve always thought that it was unfair to require both tests because AP students generally have no problem at all with the EOC and it is just an added task that they have to complete,” Burns said.

Above are the EOC and AP testing dates for the 2019-2020 school year. In the past, most of the dates would clash, forcing AP students to test on ‘make-up’ testing dates.

Lori Jenkins, American literature teacher, shares the same sentiment.

“[AP Language is] a completely different course. We don’t even plan with [Lori Vincent, AP Language teacher] because what we’re teaching is not the same course. So, it’s not fair to give students an assessment over a course that they have not taken,” Jenkins said.

One concern teachers have is how this change in EOC testing affects data and scores, including the Career Ready Performance Index (CCRPI). 

“When we get our data next year, we will have fewer high achieving students taking the test. Compared to previous years, I could see our distinguished and higher-level numbers going down,” Krista Holland, English department head at Ola High School, said.

The decrease in CCRPI score depends on how current AP students historically performed on EOCs; however, according to Natalie Gore, assistant superintendent of Henry County Schools. Gore stated that as a system, milestone scores, released in July, and CCRPI scores, released in November will be negatively affected by this amendment. 

“If the majority of AP students took the EOC and fell in the Distinguished category, then it could hurt the school’s CCRPI performance if the number of students earning A’s in AP courses is not correlated to those who achieve Level 4. If, on the other hand, our AP teachers tend to give A’s in the course at a higher rate than our AP EOC test-takers earn Distinguished scores, then it could improve our CCRPI performance,” Gore said.

Overall, although it has its disadvantages, this amendment could not only decrease the amount of stress for AP students but a step toward decreasing standardized testing in Georgia for high school students.

 

Print Friendly, PDF & Email