ELECTION 2016: Where do we stand?

The beginning of 2016 brings more than just resolutions that are destined to fail.

As the election approaches, American are taking initiative to get informed about candidates. Americans have voted for a president every four since 1776.

As the election approaches, American are taking initiative to get informed about candidates. Americans have voted for a president every four since 1776.

Ethan Zakrewski, News Editor

On November 8th, the American people will go to their nearest polling location in order to select the nation’s next president and the campaigns of presidential candidates are already in full gear.

On the Democratic Party’s side of the ledger, they will be nominating a candidate other than Barack Obama for the first time since 2008. While Martin O’Malley, former governor of Maryland, is also running for the Democratic Party, he garners less than two percent of the vote in unofficial polls. The nomination is mainly a fight between Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders and

Hillary Clinton, the wife of former president Bill Clinton. The Iowa Caucus, the first caucus of 2016 in which members of the electorate will begin to decide which candidate their electors vote for at the national convention, will take place on February first, and the latest poll conducted by the Des Moines Register and Bloomberg show Clinton holding on to a slim two-point lead.

The Republican Party still has many candidates campaigning to be the party’s nominee, but only three candidates are considered to have a reasonable shot: businessman Donald Trump, Senator Ted Cruz, and Senator Marco Rubio. Trump has polled very well since he first entered the race, but the latest Des Moines Register/ Bloomberg poll for the Iowa Caucus, Cruz leads Trump 25-22 percent with Marco Rubio a distant third gathering only 12 percent of the vote.

Polls are not always indicative of how well a candidate will perform in an election. According to Chris Gardner, AP Government teacher, polls could fail in one of many areas. First, a poll could have too small of a sample size to notice a true trend from a small sect.  Second, a question may be “loaded” and provoke a person to answer in a certain way. Third, the sample may include a disproportionate number of people who subscribe to the same ideology, and finally, a poll may not represent the people who will actually vote.

The Hoof Print will have a weekly series of Election 2016 related articles through the election in November, so stay tuned for next week’s article featuring a special guest!