The Art of Christmas-Gifting

Students+frequently+exchange+their+presents+at+school+and+host+their+own+Secret+Santa+games.+Many+students+enjoyed+both+opening+their+surprises+and+watching+their+classmates+open+theirs.
Back to Article
Back to Article

The Art of Christmas-Gifting

Students frequently exchange their presents at school and host their own Secret Santa games. Many students enjoyed both opening their surprises and watching their classmates open theirs.

Students frequently exchange their presents at school and host their own Secret Santa games. Many students enjoyed both opening their surprises and watching their classmates open theirs.

Payton DiSario

Students frequently exchange their presents at school and host their own Secret Santa games. Many students enjoyed both opening their surprises and watching their classmates open theirs.

Payton DiSario

Payton DiSario

Students frequently exchange their presents at school and host their own Secret Santa games. Many students enjoyed both opening their surprises and watching their classmates open theirs.

Payton DiSario, Copy Editor

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






The cool air, hot chocolate and night skies shining with multicolored lights can only mean one thing: Christmas season is here. While this time of year is full of joy, it is also full of the stress and pressure of Christmas gift shopping.

“[The most stressful part of Christmas is] all of the crazy people. There are so many people and traffic is terrible,” Ashlee Biggs, sophomore, said.

Crazy people crawling the stores are not the only reason the season can get a little stressful. According to Cherish Donaldson, an English teacher with two daughters, the worst part about gift-shopping is trying to remain fair.

“I have children who like things and have big lists so I stress over how to make things equal between them,” Donaldson said.

To overcome this, Donaldson uses a budget on each of her children. However, for teenagers shopping for their families and friends, using budgets can be hard when they do not have any money.

“I try to work a little bit on the side. Yeah, so I work for my mom and my dad so that’s how I make money,” Biggs said.

Another challenge is knowing what to get for various people. Some people, like Hayden Kimble, senior, merely ask for lists.

“I just ask [my family]. We use Amazon wish-lists so everything is right there,” Kimble said.

While this option may work for some people, others are much harder to buy for. Even Kimble admits that he does not have a list of his own.

“I don’t feel like I need anything so I don’t ask for anything,” Kimble said.

If that is the case, there are other tactics that people use.

“I choose presents based off of their personalities and if they’re dropping hints or not. Dropping hints definitely makes it easier on me,” Biggs said.

While hints work for tangible gifts, others do not want materials but rather to spend time together.

“I’m more about the experience. I would like since they’re older, one’s in college in working and one’s in high school with extracurriculars, I would like to do like, a family weekend together,” Donaldson said.

Whether the “perfect” present is jewelry, a new phone, cookies, or a family vacation, everyone is different. The trick is to know who you are giving to. Above all, you should not stress. Any gift can be great if there is heart and thought behind it.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email