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The Book Mark: Non-fiction nods off

Non-fiction challenges many students when compared to simpler fiction.

These+works+of+non-fiction+allow+readers+the+opportunity+to+spread+their+horizons%2C+and+the+more+knowledge+one+has+the+more+power.
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The Book Mark: Non-fiction nods off

These works of non-fiction allow readers the opportunity to spread their horizons, and the more knowledge one has the more power.

These works of non-fiction allow readers the opportunity to spread their horizons, and the more knowledge one has the more power.

Designed By Maria Adams: Book Covers By Patrik Svensson, Glen Edelstein, and Ileana Wainwright

These works of non-fiction allow readers the opportunity to spread their horizons, and the more knowledge one has the more power.

Designed By Maria Adams: Book Covers By Patrik Svensson, Glen Edelstein, and Ileana Wainwright

Designed By Maria Adams: Book Covers By Patrik Svensson, Glen Edelstein, and Ileana Wainwright

These works of non-fiction allow readers the opportunity to spread their horizons, and the more knowledge one has the more power.

Maria Adams, Copy Editor

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Many students suffer when teachers force them to read books that pre-date the last century, read like a text-book, or simply do not provide enough stimulation to keep one interested. However, the need to read is still present.

From freshman to senior year, English teachers assign passages, novels and plays, including “Romeo and Juliet,” “The Scarlet Letter,” “A Raisin in the Sun,” and “How to Kill a Mockingbird”. By doing this, teachers encourage students to broaden their horizons, but maybe we should allow students to make the decision for themselves. The books mentioned below have inspired audiences to develop a taste for non-fiction and taste for something new.

“A Child Called “It”” by Dave Pelzer, summarizes an inspirational tragedy that forces a reader to grow in both humanity and kindness. The book was setting the reader up for heartache, but it gave the reader time to digest the tragedy by spoiling the climax at the beginning of the book which in turn helps the reader struggle alongside the narrator. As a fantasy fanatic, non-fiction is hard to sit through, but this story is quick and gruesome.

The book leaves one to wonder how the narrator moved on with his life. In many instances, the abused will potentially become an abuser in an effort to heal or deal with their pasts.

It is important for people to know that no matter what lies in their past, they can overcome the dark side and press on to a brighter world.”

— Dave Pelzer

Readers need to be prepared for tears, cries of outrage and disgust; however, the book lacks the technique and vocabulary utilized in emotionally taxing non-fiction, including “Sold” by Patricia Mccormick, “Columbine” by Dave Cullen, and “Missoula” by Jon Krakauer, which all require comprehension skills. Pelzer uses child-like thoughts and tendencies to show the struggle of the story. My next choice would be “Educated” written by Tara Westover.

A struggle to leave behind what you have always known is what many college students say they face when they left home, but what happens when you leave and find out everything your parents told you was wrong?

My life was narrated for me by others. Their voices were forceful, emphatic, absolute. It had never occurred to me that my voice might be as strong as theirs.”

— Tara Westover

“Educated” leaves readers the stunning perspective of a young woman, who taught herself advance classes that many high schools struggle with, so she could escape from her extremist family. The novel was well-written and descriptive while bluntly showing the struggles and tribulations of her life.

The book resembles “A Child Called “It”” due to its memoir qualities, but it is less emotional while still shocking.

My last book is “A Brief History of Time” by Stephen Hawkings. The book was written for those preparing to understand the world in a beginner-level mindset. Hawkings wrote for those who do not have expert knowledge. I began reading the book when I started AP Physics, so this is a really good read if you are thinking about the AP classes you will take next year.

If time travel is possible, where are the tourists from the future?”

— Stephen Hawking

“A Brief History of Time” is an interesting read that captures the reader’s attention and is not similar to a textbook. The best part of the book is the author because he is so well-known for his work and knowledge.

My favorite book among these choices would be “A Brief History of Time” due to the author’s use of diction to illustrate his points. I would rate the book a 5/5. My second favorite out of the books above is “Educated”. I was really able to relate to the main character and enjoyed the structure of the book. I would rate the book a 4/5. My last choice would be “A Child Called “It””. The book was emotional and child-like in writing style, but the book touched my heart. I would rate it 4/5.

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About the Writer
Maria Adams, Copy Editor

Animated, neighborly, and resourceful, Maria Adams, junior, is one of the girls you do not want to miss meeting. Born on Dec. 20, 2001, into a moving military...

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